Category Archives: Southeastern Anatolia

Workaway: The Lisinia Project

The end of my summer holidays was marked by a visit to Lisinia, an organic farm and wildlife rehabilitation centre in Burdur, south east Turkey. I had been looking for ways to extend my ‘holidays’ and needed a reality check after my outrageously expensive stay in Dubai. This is when I came across workaway.info, probably was the most amazing discovery I had ever made.

Quick glance at Lisinia.
Quick glance at Lisinia.

Continue reading Workaway: The Lisinia Project

Retracing the steps of the Prophets

After a hearty breakfast – including a very hot and spicy scrambled egg (the waiter introduced it as pepper jam) which definitely gave us the wake-up call we needed – we set off for some more exploration. The plan for the day: go to Harran, a small village nearby, which once used to be a major city in Mesopotamian times and after. Aside from being one of the continuously inhabited spots on Earth, it is also famous for being the place where the prophet Abraham (Ibrahim) lived for a few years during his life.

Stuffing ourselves before our tiring day ahead
Stuffing ourselves before our tiring day ahead

At first, we were going to get the hotel to arrange our visit to Harran, which would have been quite at an affordable price but given the expenses accrued from our organised tours and the fact that due to road construction and renovations, we wouldn’t have seen much of what we wanted anyway, we decided against. Continue reading Retracing the steps of the Prophets

The City of Prophets

When we started this trip, it was more curiosity than anything that led us to South East Turkey. At the time, only a few months ago, there was none of this unrest that is currently happening in the region right now and it saddens be so much to read about all that is going on there at the moment. Şanlıurfa, or Urfa as it is known, is definitely one of my favourite places in Turkey and I cannot wait for when I can go back there again. It definitely has this Middle East atmosphere that most of Turkey lacks, that there are times you do tend to forget that you’re still in Turkey, especially since Arabic and Kurdish seem to be more prominent than Turkish itself in the city.

No Turkish? No problem.
No Turkish? No problem.

We went down to the first shop we saw to grab some kurabiye, which served the purpose of lunch, or was it dinner? – we could hardly keep track of time by that point By the end of the whole trip, our eating and sleeping patterns had been thoroughly messed up and we didn’t even taste the famous kebab from Urfa that everyone kept talking about. Not that I’ll be able to now, since I’ve recently turned fully vegetarian. I digress. Continue reading The City of Prophets