Slow venture into Nuremberg

If I had to describe Nuremberg, I’d say it’s a little fairytale-like town with a Thai restaurant and an Irish pub at every corner. One could say it was perfect with the winter wonderland cast around but snow and I don’t go very well together. My non-snow-proof shoes – I was being optimistic about it not snowing at all – made it hard to explore the city properly (probably my constant moaning too, poor PC) as well as my limited ability to walk in snow but I didn’t fall, so I give myself that at least. In my defense, I am from the tropics: I deal better with sand than with snow.

Winter Wonderland in Nuremberg
Winter Wonderland in Nuremberg

We never did make it to any of the museums I had on my list, especially the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, one of the most important museums in the country showcasing German culture and Spielzeugmuseum, the toy museum which needs no further introduction. We did make it quite close to the Germanisches Nationalmuseum though, to the Straße der Menschenrechte, the Way of Human Rights, located right in front of the museum’s entrance. This is a sort-of an alley with 29 pillars representing and an oak tree bearing the 30 Universal Acts of Human Rights. Each pillar is inscribed in German and then in a foreign language and the oak tree is said to represent all the other languages that are not mentioned. This outdoor sculpture represents the city’s wishes to be move from its Nazi-related reputation to being knows as the “City of Peace and Human Rights”. It was quite fun to try and guess the languages in which the articles were written – maybe not the most grown-up behaviour given the significance of the site but it was definitely more enjoyable than just a snap and run opportunity which the two Asian tourists in front of us seemed to be going for.

Article 22: Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality
Article 22: Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality
The gate to the Way of Human Rights
The gate to the Way of Human Rights
The list of languages in which the pillars had been inscribed
The list of languages in which the pillars had been inscribed

We also made a quick stop at the Handwerkernof, The Craftsman Courtyard beforehand which again reminded me of a miniature fairytale-like albeit icy wonderland. We only went into one little shop selling traditional and extremely pricey artefacts which were quite nice to look at but which clumsy me would probably break in a jiffy. We even got to see a craft exhibition of the nativity in different countries and cultures – one even had camels in them.

Entrance to the Courtyard.
Entrance to the Courtyard.
A little craft shop, reminding me of the Seven Dwarves' cottage.
A little craft shop, reminding me of the Seven Dwarves’ cottage.

I also quite enjoyed walking along the medieval city walls which apparently leads to the red district at some point. Some part of it – I’m not entirely sure which part exactly (mental note to ask PC) – is apparently rented out to charities or something like that. I was concentrating more on trying not to fall down at that point. I do think it’s quite remarkable that historical structures are not completely obsolete and have found a place in modern society rather than just being something to look at.

Off the path
Off the path

After a little detour at one of the many organic stores where I got way too excited – THEY HAD COOKIE DOUGH VEGAN ICE CREAM – and probably spent way too much money on stuff I don’t get here in Turkey, we carried on with our little tour hoping that the cooler bag we got would save the ice cream till we got home.

Cannabis chocolate anyone?
Cannabis chocolate anyone? (Just some roasted hemp seeds to be fair)
Ultimate bliss.
Ultimate bliss.

Next on the list was the Weißer Turm, White Tower, in front of which is the Ehekarussell Brunnen, the Marriage Carousel Fountain, a colossal and frankly quite amusing sculpture of six interpretations of marriage based on the poem “Bitter Sweet Married Life”  by Hans Sachs, a medieval poet.

We also visited the St Elizabeth Church, which is right opposite the Weißer Turm, after which it was straight to dinner to Hans im Glück (Königstraße 74, 90402 Nürnberg), a burger grill themed after the fairytale Hans in Luck which is recorded by the Grimm Brothers but has Germanic roots. The restaurant was quite packed and we had to wait a bit before getting a table but the burgers were probably the most delicious one I had ever had. They had several vegetarian and vegan options and they were even accommodating enough to make the changes I requested to my meal despite how busy they were.

St Elisabeth Church
St Elisabeth Church
Fairy-tale inspired menu
Fairy-tale inspired menu
Nut-based burger
Nut-based burger
Into the woods.
Into the woods.

With that ended my first day out in the city of Nuremberg but certainly not the last one.

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